What your coffee habit costs you in calories: Experts reveal what latte REALLY means for waistline


What your coffee habit is costing you in calories: Experts reveal what your daily latte REALLY means for your waistline

  • Health experts have revealed what your coffee habit means for your waistline
  • Two small full cream milk coffees per day can quickly add up in terms of calories
  • Previously, the experts have shared how boozy nights out impact weight loss

Experts have revealed what your daily coffee habit is doing to your waistline, and it’s bad news for those who drink two lattes every day.

Health experts from the science-based nutrition program Equalution, from Sydney, explained that two small full cream milk coffees every day can quickly add up in terms of calories, and 14 coffees per week is the equivalent 25.5 popping candy elf chocolates.

‘What if something you’re doing each day without consideration is impacting your results week by week?’ their team posted on Instagram.

Experts have revealed what your daily coffee habit is doing to your waistline, and it’s bad news for those who drink two lattes every day (pictured)

‘Here’s the good news: You CAN still have your cake and eat it too and it is possible to incorporate treats you love as part of a balanced diet while losing weight.’ 

If you’re eating well and still not losing weight, the founders said it might be time to look towards ‘those little extras’ which you can often attribute to ‘weight gain or lack of results’.

‘The body doesn’t recognise food as good or bad; instead it is recognised simply as macronutrients so protein, fats and carbs,’ they said.

If you want to lose weight, Equalution said you need to be eating and drinking in a 'calorie deficit' and paying attention to all Christmas treats (pictured)

If you want to lose weight, Equalution said you need to be eating and drinking in a ‘calorie deficit’ and paying attention to all Christmas treats (pictured)

If you want to lose weight, Equalution said you need to be eating and drinking in a ‘calorie deficit’.

‘To lose weight, you need to be eating in a calorie deficit (eating less than you’re expending energy wise),’ they said.

‘If you want to gain weight, then you need to be in a calorie surplus (eating more than you’re expending energy wise).

‘If you want to maintain your weight, then you need to be consuming the same energy (calories) as your total daily energy expenditure.’  

Thousands who saw the post were quick to say they were shocked by how quickly coffees can quickly add up in your daily intake.

‘Oh my god, this is why I need to stop drinking milk,’ one person posted.

‘Omg, we have both,’ another added.

Previously, Equalution have shared snack warnings about how a day of healthy treats can quickly add up to 5,000 calories (pictured)

Previously, Equalution have shared snack warnings about how a day of healthy treats can quickly add up to 5,000 calories (pictured)

Other graphs show how one boozy day can quickly contribute to an entire day of eating (pictured)

Other graphs show how one boozy day can quickly contribute to an entire day of eating (pictured)

Previously, Equalution have shared snack warnings about how a day of healthy treats can quickly add up to 5,000 calories.

Sydney founders of science-based nutrition program Equalution Jade Spooner and Amal Wakim recently shared a graph to highlight exactly what seven days of snacking can look like in calories by comparing healthy treats to cheeseburgers. 

The pair found the snacks consumed over seven days contain more calories than 16-and-a-half McDonald’s cheeseburgers (4,966 calories). A single cheeseburger contains 300 calories.

The graph shows how you can add a further 722 calories to your daily intake just by snacking on a cookie, three tiny Easter egg chocolates, fruit and nut mix, and muesli, along with two cups of coffee with full cream milk.

Other graphs show how one boozy day can quickly contribute to an entire day of eating.

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